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Wish Upon (2017). Horror Movies. Reviews

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Wish Upon (2017). A John R. Leonetti film
Wish Upon (2017). A John R. Leonetti film

Wish Upon is a 2017 horror movie directed by John R. Leonetti. Starring Joey King, Ryan Phillippe and Elisabeth Röhm.

A soft horror movie for this summer.

Wish Upon. Plot. Synopsis

When a 17 year old girl (Joey King) is given a mysterious music box, her wishes start coming true. But she slowly discovers there’s a ‘bloody price’ attached to each new wish. (Filmaffinity)

Movie Reviews

“A deeply silly midsummer lark that makes up for the fact that it’s about nothing by being incredibly entertaining (…) The silly horror film ‘Wish Upon’ is a future camp classic” Emily Yoshida: Vulture

“‘Wish Upon’ would rather make you jump than gag. The splatter is deployed cautiously and sometimes wittily” Jeannette Catsoulis: The New York Times

Movie Trailer

Cast & Crew

Buckley’s Chance (2021). Starring Bill Nighy. Official Trailer

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Buckley's Chance (2021). A Tim Brown Movie
Buckley's Chance (2021). A Tim Brown Movie

Buckley’s Chance is a 2021 movie directed by Tim Brown. Starring Bill Nighy (Love Actually).

The screenplay is written by Tim Brown and Willem Wennekers

Buckley’s Chance. Plot. Synopsis

Tras perA year after the loss of his father, Ridley and his mother, Gloria, move to Western Australian to live with Ridley’s estranged grandfather Spencer. Once there Spencer tries to connect with Ridley but all efforts usually lead to conflict. Ridley ends up lost deep in the outback on a quest to try to get home. (filmaffinity)

Movie Trailer

Cast & Crew

Together (2021). Upcoming Releases. Official Trailer

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Together (2021). A Stephen Daldry film
Together (2021). A Stephen Daldry film

Together is a 2021 movie directed by Stephen Daldry. The film is written by Dennis Kelly. Starring James McAvoy and Sharon Horgan.

Together. Plot. Synopsis

A husband and wife who are forced to re-evaluate themselves and their relationship through the reality of the Covid-19 lockdown. (Filmaffinity)

Movie Trailer

Cast & Crew

Nolan Oswald Dennis: conditions | Goodman Gallery Johannesburg

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Nolan Oswald Dennis, cycliverse model (cosmogony), 2021
Nolan Oswald Dennis, cycliverse model (cosmogony), 2021

Goodman Gallery is pleased to present conditions, Nolan Oswald Dennis’ third solo exhibition with Goodman Gallery.

The exhibition presents a new series of works centered around the figure of the globe. Incorporating the shape into various configurations, Dennis presents different perspectives on our familiar world as a means toward imagining new possibilities.

“Within this burning planet has always existed another world, and the struggle to realise it,” says Dennis. “The logic of colonial cosmology insists on the universality of the Western world: a planet rendered as private property, as social violence, as deliberate crisis. Occupying the same space and time as the colonial planet are other worlds. A planet rendered whole as indigenous land and life; a queer planet rendered just, feminist, socialist; a planet facing south, and east, and waterward. Altogether an ecology of black planets – a black cosmography (where black is a vector that opens toward hidden conditions of space and time).”

The spherical globe is the idealised figure of the planet in Western cosmology: seamless, smooth, unitary and knowable. Counter to this image of the world, Dennis proposes a series of transformations of the sphere, distorting and stretching the model in order to find space for other worlds, other worldly possibilities.

In reality, the geometry of the globe is a more imperfect spheroid shape. In deviating from the prevailing platonic sphere by abstracting the classic colonial image of the globe, we move “closer to the shape of the actual planet,” says Dennis. “Which is to say the planet as a complex topological figure which emerges from and merges with the world it prefigures. Our task has always been to complicate that figure, to configure the planet in such a way that it can hold other worlds.”

A number of abstracted globes included in the exhibition help articulate this position. These sculptural models form part of a series titled ‘a black cosmography’, which reference planetary images from popular culture, in particular Public Enemy’s album ‘Fear of a Black Planet’ (1990) and The Brother Moves On album, ‘A New Myth’ (2013). In addition, the globes draw on the dark matter hypothesis in the standard model of particle physics as well as multiverse theory in cosmology.

Dennis adopts a systems-based approach to conceive of new models for envisioning the planet and world it contains. For conditions, Dennis grounds this in a new earth-system model called a garden for fanon. The work — an extension of the ongoing research project ‘a curriculum for mud’ started in 2017 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — looks at soil as a complex model for social and political life on this planet. This is achieved using a bio-technical apparatus that turns texts from the black liberation archive into soil in collaboration with a community of eisnia foetida earthworms.

For the duration of the exhibition, the worms will consume the cellulose fibre of the books, converting these into flesh, energy, heat and worm castings that fertilise the soil. In doing so, the work acts as a gesture toward “sharing knowledge with soil, worms, and the earth itself, set[ting] up conditions of possibility in which an expanded collective can consider the world otherwise.”

As with any system, a series of protocols are essential to the management of this work. Alongside maintaining a consistent temperature and light frequency, a set of ‘care protocols’ are to be enacted. These will take the form of a series of readings, where invited participants will be asked to recite extracts from texts used in the work, to the worms as well as a small group of people. A series of new drawings and diagrams are presented as annotations to these models and systems.

More about the artist

Nolan Oswald Dennis (b. 1988, Zambia) is an interdisciplinary artist from Johannesburg, South Africa. His practice explores what he calls ‘a black consciousness of space’: the material and metaphysical conditions of decolonization. Born in Lusaka, Zambia and raised in Midrand, South Africa. He holds a Bachelors degree in architecture from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) and a Masters of Science in Art, Culture and Technology for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Dennis’ work questions the politics of space and time through a system-specific, rather than sitespecific approach. He is concerned with the hidden structures that pre-determine the limits of our social and political imagination. Through a language of diagrams, drawings and models he explores a hidden landscape of systematic and structural conditions that organise our political subterrain. This sub-space is framed by systems which transverse multiple realms (technical, spiritual economic, psychological, etc) and therefore Dennis’ work can be seen as an attempt to stitch these, sometime opposed, sometimes complimentary, systems together. To read technological systems alongside spiritual systems, to combine political fictions with science fiction.

Dennis’ is the 2016 winner of the FNB Arts Prize, and has exhibited in various solo and group shows, including the 9th Berlin Biennale (2016), the Young Congo Biennale (2019), Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA), Architekturmuseum der TU München, among others. He is participating in upcoming exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo (Paris), Le Lieu Unique (Nantes), and the Goodman Gallery, and is a 2020 artist in residence at NTUCCA (Singapore).

Dennis will be the next artist in residence at the Delfina Foundation, London from September 2021.

Metal, Wood, Water,
Fire, and Earth. Curated by Michael Xufu Huang. Pace Gallery

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Zhang Zipiao, Peony 04, 2020 © Zhang Zipiao, courtesy Pace Gallery and WHITE SPACE BEIJING
Zhang Zipiao, Peony 04, 2020 © Zhang Zipiao, courtesy Pace Gallery and WHITE SPACE BEIJING

Palo Alto — Pace Gallery is pleased to present Metal, Wood, Water, Fire, and Earth—a group exhibition curated by art patron and founder of Beijing’s X Museum Michael Xufu Huang—which features the work of five leading young contemporary women artists from China. This collaborative presentation continues Pace’s mission of cultivating and supporting artists within a global context, offering a platform to highlight the compelling visual achievements of a new younger generation of artists working in Asia today, and reinforcing the gallery’s commitment to the region, where it operates a gallery in Hong Kong, a viewing room in Beijing, and a new, larger gallery space in Seoul which opened in May 2021.

The premise of the exhibition was conceived by Huang and aligns the individual practice of each artist with one of the Five Elements, an important theory in ancient Chinese philosophy that emphasizes the idea of “wholeness” and illustrates the interconnected relationships between the phenomena of the natural world: metal, wood, water, fire and earth. The exhibition will feature over 15 works, including painting, works on paper, and sculpture by Cui Jie, Yang Bodu, Li Shurui, Zhang Zipiao, and Zhang Ruyi. Metal, Wood, Water, Fire, and Earth will be on view at Pace’s Palo Alto gallery location from July 14 – August 21, 2021.

The concept of the Five Elements is recorded in the Hong Fan, part of the Shang Shu—one of the oldest surviving texts in Chinese culture and one of the Five Classics of ancient Chinese literature—and was first introduced by Ji Zi to King Wu of Zhou: “(The nature of) water is to soak and descend; of fire, to blaze and ascend; of wood, to be crooked and straight; of metal, to yield and change; while (that of) earth is seen in seed-sowing and in-gathering. That which soaks and descends becomes salt; that which blazes and ascends becomes bitter; that which is crooked and straight becomes sour; that which yields and changes becomes acrid; and from seed-sowing and in-gathering comes sweetness.”

Huang’s curatorial premise proposes that the Five Elements, respectively, represent the five young artists and uses the philosophical concept as a lens to interpret their innovative and distinct aesthetic styles: Cui (“Metal”), Yang (“Wood), Li (“Water”), Zhang Zipiao (“Fire”), and Zhang Ruyi (“Earth”).

Cui is known for her paintings that capture the different architectural styles of the rapid urbanization of China’s built environments, continuously shifting and transforming in a process of modernization and innovation. Her interest in the history of architecture and the structures of modernism resonate in her work. In Swan Swirl Chair #2 (2020), Cui references the Danish architect Arne Jacobsen, who designed the Swan Chair in 1956 for the SAS Royal Hotel. Set against a pink and black ground, the mid-century chair intersects with a swirling, futuristic cosmic steel sculpture.

Yang’s work explores the interaction between spaces. The subject of her painting is often museums or art galleries, and the relationships that exist between the artwork and the audience within them. In Legend of the Mountain (2021) or In the Museum 2021 May (2021), Yang creates imagined environments and isolated spaces, fabricated from memories that are at once familiar and trigger the unconscious mind. Her luminous, wistful atmospheres stretch out like trees: pensive, expansive, and still, and the spaces she creates explore the subtlety and tension between looking and being.

Li’s work examines the dynamics of light and color, and the meaning behind these terms, exploring the multifaceted ideas they signify within a cultural and political context. Making Up for Lost Spring No. 49 (2021) features a canvas in the form of a flower, painted in luminescent shades of green and purple. Similarly, Making Up for Lost Spring No. 50 (2021) features a diagonal gradation of hues in soft purple and blue, exemplifying the artist’s ongoing exploration of color systems. Employing a highly personal and creative approach, Li’s practice harnesses a fluidity, like a stream of water that immerses and engages the viewer in the emotive impressions that her work leaves behind.

A highlight of the exhibition are Zhang Zipiao’s paintings, which are influenced by the culture of social media and employ bold, gestural brushstrokes to create flaming, full-bodied, and rich images charged with emotion. The budding blooms of Zhang’s large-scale Peony paintings (2020-21) are vibrant and lush. Deep magenta meets translucent layers of bubblegum pink, mesmerizing neon green strokes, and wisps of violet that fade to black. Her flowers are palpable and evoke physical bodily sensations such as organs and flesh. Her brush challenges the organic shape of her forms, which teeter on the brink between vulnerability and violence.

Lastly, Zhang Ruyi’s conceptual practice is rooted in the everyday and employs the mundane and the trivial to explore a tension between nature and urban development, architecture and technology, the individual and industrialized society. Her sculptures of potted plants and planters use concrete, a construction material, which she casts into pigmented forms, such as cacti in earthen hues of red, blue, and gray. In her mixed media works, the artist arranges the basic shapes of circles, triangles, or squares in intentional ways to manifest a sophisticated rationality as solid and as calm as the earth.

Pace is a leading international art gallery representing some of the most influential contemporary artists and estates from the past century, holding decades-long relationships with Alexander Calder, Jean Dubuffet, Barbara Hepworth, Agnes Martin, Louise Nevelson, and Mark Rothko. Pace enjoys a unique U.S. heritage spanning East and West coasts through its early support of artists central to the Abstract Expressionist and Light and Space movements.

Since its founding by Arne Glimcher in 1960, Pace has developed a distinguished legacy as an artist-first gallery that mounts seminal historical and contemporary exhibitions. Under the current leadership of President and CEO Marc Glimcher, Pace continues to support its artists and share their visionary work with audiences worldwide by remaining at the forefront of innovation. Now in its seventh decade, the gallery advances its mission through a robust global program—comprising exhibitions, artist projects, public installations, institutional collaborations, performances, and interdisciplinary projects. Pace has a legacy in art bookmaking and has published over five hundred titles in close collaboration with artists, with a focus on original scholarship and on introducing new voices to the art historical canon. The gallery has also spearheaded exploration into the intersection of art and technology through new business models, exhibition interpretation tools, and representation of artists engaging with technology.

Today, Pace has nine locations worldwide including London, Geneva, a strong foothold in Palo Alto, and two galleries in New York—its headquarters at 540 West 25th Street, which welcomed almost 120,000 visitors and programmed 20 shows in its first six months and an adjacent 8,000 sq. ft. exhibition space at 510 West 25th Street. Pace was one of the first international galleries to establish outposts in Asia, where it operates permanent gallery spaces in Hong Kong and Seoul, as well as an office and viewing room in Beijing. In 2020, Pace opened temporary exhibition spaces in East Hampton and Palm Beach, with continued programming on a seasonal basis. In fall 2021, Pace will continue to expand its European presence with the opening of a larger gallery space in London.

Shortwave | Kalanjay Dhir | the best i can do is redirect energy, 2021. Sydney Opera House

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Kalanjay Dhir
Kalanjay Dhir

Kalanjay Dhir is a Western Sydney-based artist and musician – one half of Slim Set, one of the founders of Pari artist-run space in Parramatta, and the co-host of ‘Sunset with 2K’ on FBi Radio. Dhir’s work draws on narratives in popular culture, sci-fi and spiritual texts, exploring mythological and speculative technologies through sculpture, video and internet objects. This new work created for Shortwave the best i can do is redirect energy, 2021 is a cookery simulation-styled compilation that takes inspiration from the dopamine-inducing timelines of YouTube tutorials, Vstreamers and games.

ART: Shortwave | Kalanjay Dhir | the best i can do is redirect energy, 2021

Ensemble Offspring – Mesmerism | From Our House To Yours. Sydney Opera House

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Ensemble Offspring - Mesmerism | From Our House To Yours. Sydney Opera House
Ensemble Offspring - Mesmerism | From Our House To Yours. Sydney Opera House

Filmed in the Joan Sutherland Theatre as part of the Opera House’s 2020 From Our House To Yours digital season, witness the risk taking and virtuosic instrumentalists of Ensemble Offspring perform an intimate and eclectic program of progressive and innovative music of our time. The ensemble is led by acclaimed percussionist and artistic director Claire Edwardes and features Ben Kopp (piano), Lamorna Nightingale (flutes), Jason Noble (clarinets), and the group’s 2020 Hatched Associate Artist Will Hansen (double bass).

MUSIC: Ensemble Offspring – Mesmerism | From Our House To Yours

ACO StudioCasts. Sydney Opera House. On Stream

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ACO Studiocasts
ACO Studiocasts

Four concert films from the 2021 ACO StudioCast series are bundled at the special price of $30, available to watch for 30 days. These immersive and cinematic films by leading directors and cinematographers are accompanied by a free short film featuring Richard Tognetti, the orchestra and special guests to enhance your understanding and appreciation of the music and the ACO, an orchestra that pushes the limits of performance into new and exciting realms.

?      Rapture & Revolution – Filmed in the grand and expansive Sydney Town Hall, this concert film features Richard Tognetti performing Vaughan Willams’s ‘The Lark Ascending’ alongside Beethoven’s ‘Cavatina’ and ‘Grosse Fuge’.

?      Bach and the Beyond – This evocative and impassioned concert film pitches Bach’s timeless search for redemption alongside compositions by Richard Tognetti, including a special performance of Bach’s ‘The Musical Offering’, featuring flautist Emmanuel Pahud.

?      Love & Transfiguration – Peteris Vasks’ ‘Vox amoris’ and Schoenberg’s ‘Verklärte Nacht’ show us that light and joy can come from what feels like our darkest moments. This is a film where love transforms from sombre hues and shadows to the warmth and radiance of new light.

?      Tchaikovsky’s Serenade – This magical film celebrates composers who write music from the heart. Featuring Tchaikovsky’s beloved ‘Serenade for Strings’ and George Walker’s ‘Lyric for Strings’, this is music that gives back something truly special back to the world.

More: ACO StudioCasts

Pipilotti Rist: Your Eye Is My Island. Art Tower, Mito, Japan

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Pipilotti Rist: Your Eye Is My Island 7 August – 17 October 2021 Art Tower, Mito, Japan
Pipilotti Rist: Your Eye Is My Island 7 August – 17 October 2021 Art Tower, Mito, Japan

Travelled from The National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto, this retrospective focuses on Pipilotti Rist, an internationally active contemporary artist based in Switzerland. Rist’s video installations, consisting of comforting, sensorially stimulating music, and humorous snatches of images depicting a realm of vivid color, have charmed viewers of all ages throughout the world.

The exhibition consists of about 40 works, dealing with themes such as the body, women, nature, and ecology. Functioning as a complete overview of Rist’s approximately 30-year career, the retrospective encompasses everything from the artist’s early short videos focusing on the female body and identity; a major work that was presented at the Venice Biennale; a recent large-scale video installation, which gently extols a symbiosis between nature and humans using state-of-the-art video techniques; a new work that incorporates pieces from the museum collection; and an outdoor work fashioned out of recycled materials. With playful and immersive video experiences, which enable the viewer to relax on a bed and sit around a dining table, the exhibition restructures the relationship between the viewer and the museum in the era of the coronavirus, while also gradually unraveling pressing themes in contemporary society by means of the viewer’s body.

Zhang Enli: A Room With Colour. Long Museum (Chongqing), Chongqing, China

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Zhang Enli: A Room With Colour 21 August – 21 November 2021 Long Museum (Chongqing), Chongqing, China
Zhang Enli: A Room With Colour 21 August – 21 November 2021 Long Museum (Chongqing), Chongqing, China

From 21st August to 21st November 2021, Long Museum (Chongqing) will present the exhibition ‘Zhang Enli: A Room with Colour’. Curated by Wang Wei, director of the Long Museum, is the first major retrospective of Zhang’s works in the Southwest of China. It will feature over 70 works, including urban portraits from the 1990s to the early 2000s, depictions of everyday objects from the 2000s to the 2010s, abstract paintings and ‘space painting’ installations created in recent years, as well as several manuscripts and a video. These works systematically present the artist’s 30-year creative journey.

Zhang’s works have been collected by the Tate Modern, and have been exhibited at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, amongst other institutions. Each stage of Zhang’s works has its own style, but the changes in theme and technique are not sudden, but rather a natural shift in style throughout his work. When we look closely at Zhang’s different series of works, we can perceive the intimate connection between them, that is, the artist’s constant concern for humanity, for everyday objects, for life, and for space.